Saravana Pandian Annamalai
25. April 2019 · Write a comment · Categories: ARM, Embedded Software · Tags: , , ,

In our earlier blogs on ARM Interrupt architectures, we explored the ARM exception models and registers. Also, we went through different kinds of Interrupt controllers being used. In the upcoming blogs, we will primarily see ARM Interrupt handling from the firmware/software perspective including operating systems like FreeRTOS, Linux and WinCE. To being with, this blog will discuss interrupt handling in ARM Cortex M MCUs.

Cortex M Vector Table

As discussed earlier, the ARM Cortex M series of MCUs typically carters to lower end application with the core running between a few MHz to a maximum 150MHz. To target low cost tools and ease of development, the interrupt architecture is designed to be simpler and straight forward. The vector table in ARM Cortex M series looks like:

Cortex M Vector Table

Typically, on power-on reset, the Vector table base address is defined to be at 0. The ARM core, up on boot up, loads the stack pointer with the value stored at offset 0. And then it loads the Program counter with the address available at offset 4 and starts executing the same.

Thus, the vector table design is such that the stack is operational before the core starts executing thereby eliminating the need for an assembly code to set things up for calling functions. In the firmware perspective, this is a major advantage. There is no need to write any assembly code.

Following these 2 words, the table should hold the addresses of the exception handlers. The first 14 of them are pre-defined ad reserved for handling specific to the core and its execution. From offset, 0x40, the SoC specific interrupt handlers are defined and can be customized by the silicon vendor.

It can also be noted that there is a priority associated with each of these exceptions. Lower the number the higher the priority. Some of the major exceptions defined by ARM are

Reset Handler

At the highest priority of -3, this is the entry point of execution. Loaded to PC on power on reset, this is responsible for initializing the system peripherals and start executing the firmware/OS.

NMI Handler

At a priority only next to Reset Handler (-2), as the name suggests this cannot be masked by software. It is typically triggered by a specialized peripheral unit that can be connected to a critical functionality.

HardFault Handler

This exception is caused when there is an error during exception processing. At a higher priority of -1 than other exception, this can be used to recover from issues during exception handling.

MemManage Handler

Caused due to memory protection faults, the priority level can be configured by the firmware.

BusFault Handler

Caused during to memory access – either during instruction fetch or data access, the priority level can be configured by the firmware

UsageFault Handler

Caused during to instruction executing, the priority level can be configured by the firmware. The handler is called when one of the following errors occurs

  • Presence of an undefined instruction
  • Performing an illegal unaligned access
  • Core in invalid state on instruction execution
  • An error occurring on exception return.
  • Doing an unaligned address on word and halfword memory access
  • Performing division by zero

SVCall Handler

Known as the Supervisor Call, this handler is called up on the core executing a SVC instruction. This is typically used in OS environments to execute system services.

PendSV Handler

This is typically used in OS environments to perform context switching.

SysTick Handler

The ARM Cortex M core defines a specialize timer module to keep track of the System time. This handler is executed once this timer value reaches 0.

With this understanding of Cortex M vector table, now we will see how the firmware handles exceptions in software.

Cortex M Vector Table

To practically understand Cortex M Interrupt handling, we will take an example of software implementation of FreeRTOS running on NXP K66 MCU compiled using GCC tool chain. The first and foremost step is to define the vector table and place it in the Vector base location. The vector table for the device looks like this:

__attribute__ ((used, section(“.isr_vector”)))

void (* const g_pfnVectors[])(void) = {

// Core Level – CM4

&_vStackTop,                            // The initial stack pointer

ResetISR,                                   // The reset handler

NMI_Handler,                           // The NMI handler

HardFault_Handler,                   // The hard fault handler

MemManage_Handler,              // The MPU fault handler

BusFault_Handler,                     // The bus fault handler

UsageFault_Handler,                 // The usage fault handler

0,                                                // Reserved

0,                                                // Reserved

0,                                                // Reserved

0,                                                // Reserved

SVC_Handler,                           // SVCall handler

DebugMon_Handler,                // Debug monitor handler

0,                                               // Reserved

PendSV_Handler,                     // The PendSV handler

SysTick_Handler,                     // The SysTick handler

 

// Chip Level – MK66F18

DMA0_DMA16_IRQHandler,       // 16 : DMA Channel 0, 16 Transfer Complete

DMA1_DMA17_IRQHandler,       // 17 : DMA Channel 1, 17 Transfer Complete

DMA2_DMA18_IRQHandler,       // 18 : DMA Channel 2, 18 Transfer Complete

:

:

UART0_RX_TX_IRQHandler,      // 47 : UART0 Receive/Transmit interrupt

:

:

CAN1_Tx_Warning_IRQHandler,  // 113: CAN1 Tx warning interrupt

CAN1_Rx_Warning_IRQHandler,  // 114: CAN1 Rx warning interrupt

CAN1_Wake_Up_IRQHandler,      // 115: CAN1 wake up interrupt

 

}; /* End of g_pfnVectors */

As it can be seen, the interrupt handlers are clubbed together as an array with the address to the top of the stack (lowest address as it grows towards higher address) as the first element. This array is placed in address 0, via linker script mechanism. In this example, using the section (.isr_vector) keyword, the location of the vector table is set to 0.

Also, it can be noted that there are hundreds of interrupt handlers supported. Even this example has close to 115 handlers. Obviously, a firmware system will not have all these implemented, hardly 20-30 interrupts will be used in a system. Instead of asking the user to define handlers, the start-up code provided by the silicon vendors, will have dummy functions (a while (1) loop) defined with weak reference.

weak void NMI_Handler(void)

{ while(1) {}

}

WEAK_AV void SVC_Handler(void)

{ while(1) {}

}

So, when the developer defines an interrupt handler with the same name in his code, this weak function will be discarded and user-defined function linked against instead.

Cortex M Interrupt Handling

With the vector table installed, the functions that are needed can be added one by one in the firmware. As a first step, the Reset Handler has to be created. At typical, reset handler will look like as below.

void ResetISR(void) {

// Disable interrupts

__asm volatile (cpsid i”);

// If __USE_CMSIS defined, then call CMSIS SystemInit code

SystemInit();

//

// Copy the data sections from flash to SRAM.

//

unsigned int LoadAddr, ExeAddr, SectionLen;

unsigned int *SectionTableAddr;

// Load base address of Global Section Table

SectionTableAddr = &__data_section_table;

// Copy the data sections from flash to SRAM.

while (SectionTableAddr < &__data_section_table_end) {

LoadAddr = *SectionTableAddr++;

ExeAddr = *SectionTableAddr++;

SectionLen = *SectionTableAddr++;

data_init(LoadAddr, ExeAddr, SectionLen);

}

// At this point, SectionTableAddr = &__bss_section_table;

// Zero fill the bss segment

while (SectionTableAddr < &__bss_section_table_end) {

ExeAddr = *SectionTableAddr++;

SectionLen = *SectionTableAddr++;

bss_init(ExeAddr, SectionLen);

}

// Reenable interrupts

__asm volatile (cpsie i”);

main();

//

// main() shouldn’t return, but if it does, we’ll just enter an infinite loop

//

while (1) {

;

}

}

This minimalistic handler, disables all interrupts up on entry, configures the core and major peripherals via SystemInit function. Then it initializes the data and bss sections. Finally, it enables the interrupts before jumping to the main function.

Now we will see how a peripheral is configured for interrupt operation based on the Systick unit.

uint32_t SysTick_Config(uint32_t ticks)

{

if ((ticks – 1UL) > SysTick_LOAD_RELOAD_Msk)

{

return (1UL); /* Reload value impossible */

}

SysTick->LOAD = (uint32_t)(ticks – 1UL); /* set reload register */

NVIC_SetPriority (SysTick_IRQn, (1UL << __NVIC_PRIO_BITS) – 1UL); /* set Priority for Systick Interrupt */

SysTick->VAL = 0UL; /* Load the SysTick Counter Value */

SysTick->CTRL = SysTick_CTRL_CLKSOURCE_Msk |

SysTick_CTRL_TICKINT_Msk |

SysTick_CTRL_ENABLE_Msk; /* Enable SysTick IRQ and SysTick Timer */

return (0UL); /* Function successful */

}

As the code listing shows, the function configures various registers needed for proper operation of the Systick interrupt such as LOAD, VAL, CTRL etc. IT=t also configures the priority of the interrupt. As mentioned earlier, in Cortex M architecture, each of the interrupts has an associated priority. Depending on the implementation, there could be n number of bits corresponding to each interrupt number. Lower the number, higher the priority/urgency and can be set via the NVIC_SetPriority CMSIS API. With this mechanism, it is possible for the interrupts to be prioritized and only the higher priority one will be serviced if more than one interrupt is pending at the same time.

Typical handler for SysTick looks like:

void SysTickHandler( void )

{

/* The SysTick runs at the lowest interrupt priority, so when this interrupt

executes all interrupts must be unmasked. There is therefore no need to

save and then restore the interrupt mask value as its value is already

known. */

         portDISABLE_INTERRUPTS();

         {

                    /* Increment the RTOS tick. */

                    if( xTaskIncrementTick() != pdFALSE )

                   {

                                  /* A context switch is required. Context switching is performed in the PendSV interrupt. Pend the PendSV interrupt. */

                            portNVIC_INT_CTRL_REG = portNVIC_PENDSVSET_BIT;

                  }

         }

     portENABLE_INTERRUPTS();

}

Cortex M Interrupt Handling via Assembly

So far, we have not writing a single line of assembly code and still able to do all the required functionality in software. In some cases, there will be a need to do assembly code. In these cases, the handler can be defined as naked function (Which will not generate any stack push/pop and return codes) and implement them in assembly.

For example, in FreeRTOS, the SVC Handler implementation is as below:

void vPortSVCHandler( void ) __attribute__ (( naked ));

void vPortSVCHandler( void )

{

     __asm volatile (

     ldr r3, pxCurrentTCBConst2 \n” /* Restore the context. */

     ldr r1, [r3] \n” /* Use pxCurrentTCBConst to get the pxCurrentTCB address. */

     ldr r0, [r1] \n” /* The first item in pxCurrentTCB is the task top of stack. */

     ldmia r0!, {r4-r11, r14} \n” /* Pop the registers that are not automatically saved on exception entry and the critical nesting count. */

     msr psp, r0 \n” /* Restore the task stack pointer. */

     isb \n”

     mov r0, #0 \n”

     msr basepri, r0 \n”

     bx r14 \n”

     ” \n”

     ” .align 4 \n”

     “pxCurrentTCBConst2: .word pxCurrentTCB \n”

     );

}

Thus with compiler extensions, it is possible to include assembly based interrupt handling as well.

Switching Vector tables

In the above examples, we have noted that the vector table is located at address 0. But there are cases, where we will need to place it at a different location. For example, the flash location could be at address 0, and the RAM, where the user wants to place the vector table could be elsewhere. Or it could be a dual A/B firmware or a bootloader/application firmware each sitting at a different location. So, based on the current code being executed, the vector table location differs.

ARM provides a simple mechanism to switch the base address of the vector table. It provides a Vector table offset register at address 0xE000ED08 in the NVIC group, where the base address can be programmed. For example, to switch the vector location to address 0x20000000, following lines will suffice.

In the last blog, we have covered the basics of CAN communication. Now, we will see about some of the advanced concepts involved such as Bit Stuffing, frame types, error types, Synchronization etc. We will also look into some of the non-standard extensions available in modern CAN controllers.

Generally, all CAN modules support the classical CAN protocol. It can receive and transmit both CAN base and the CAN extended frames. The transmission and reception of CAN FD frames is optional. Classical CAN Implementation do not support 29-bit identifiers. CAN 2.0B passive nodes were compliant with ISO 11898-1:2003, but it used very rarely. In this context, let us explore some of other concepts in detail.

Bit Stuffing

Bit Stuffing is used to ensure the synchronization of all nodes even when transmitting consecutive information with same value either 1 or 0.
During the transmission of message, a maximum of five consecutive bits may have the same polarity. In this case, the transmitter will insert the one additional bit of opposite polarity into the bit stream before transmitting the further bits. This will ensure that there is always some activity in the bus with in 6-bit intervals and hence avoid DC Voltage build up as well as being in sync with the transmitter.

Stuffing and De-stuffing

On the receiving end, similarly the receiver also checks the number of bits of same polarity and removes the stuffed bits again from the bit stream in a process called de-stuffing.

CAN Frame Types

There are 5 types of frames in CAN protocol;

Data Frame (DF):

Carries Data from transmitting node to receiving node.

Remote Frame (RF):

Some times, a node might want to request some data from another which is made possible by Remote frame.
There are two differences between data and Remote frames.
RTR field of a data frame is dominant and RTR field of remote frame is recessive.
In data frame format data field is present, whereas in Remote frame format data field is absent.

The receiver will understand that transmitter is requesting some date and then prepares and sends the Data frame based on the protocol.

Error Frame (EF):

This type of frame is transmitted by any node to signal error.
The error frame consists of two different fields in CAN.
superposition of ERROR FLAGS (6–12 dominant/recessive bits)
ERROR DELIMITER (8 recessive bits).
There are two types of error flags:

Active Error Flag

When the Transmitting node transmitted six dominant bits, the error will be detected in network and the error sate called active error flag.

Passive Error Flag

When the Transmitting node transmitted six recessive bits, the error will be detected in network and the error sate called passive error flag.

Now let us see, how the CAN manages error states. In every CAN node, there are 2 error counters – Transmit Error Counter (TEC) and Receive Error Counter (REC). When the transmitter detects an error in the transmitted frame, it increments the TEC by 8. A receiver detecting an error will increment its REC by 1. On successful transmission/reception the error counters are reduced by 1.
Based on the error counts, the node behavior varies.

  • By default, the Active Error frame will be transmitted on the bus, when TEC and REC < 128. Thus, it will invalidate the frame globally.
  • But when 127 < TEC \ REC > 255, the passive Error frame will be transmitted on the bus, without affecting the bus traffic.
  • Finally, the node enters into the Bus off state, when TEC > 255. If node enters into the bus off state then no frames will be transmitted.

In any case, both transmitter and receiver reject the erroneous frames completely and do not process it any further.

Overload Frame (OF):

Overload frame contains two fields such as Overload flag and Overload Delimiter.
The over load frame will be generated, when the receiving node is overloaded – i.e. it is not able to detect and receive the incoming messages. The format is very similar to Error Frame but without the error counters incrementing. An Overload frame indicates that its transmitter require delay before receiving next data or remote frame and is mostly not used in modern CAN controllers.

Inter Frame Space (IFS):

Data frames and remote frames are separated from preceding frames and succeeding frame by a bit field called interframe space. It consists of three consecutive recessive bits. Following that, if a dominant bit is detected, it will be regarded as the “Start of frame” bit of the next frame.

Frame on CAN BUS

Error Types

There are 5 types of error in CAN protocol.

Bit error:

Every node reads back, bit by bit from the bus during transmitting the message and then compares the transmitted bit value with received bit value. If bit received does not match with bit sent, then Bit error is said to be occurred.

Stuff error:

Set when more than five consecutive bits of same polarity are received in receiving node.

CRC error:

A transmitted always transmits the CRC value in the CRC field of CAN frame. The receiving node also calculates the CRC value using same formula and compares with received CRC value. If receiving node detects mismatch between calculated CRC values and received CRC value then it is called CRC error.

ACK error:

Occurs when no acknowledgment is sent by receiving node or no acknowledgment received in transmitting node.

Form error:

Set when fixed format fields in receive frame is violated. No dominant bits are allowed in CRC delimiter, ACK delimiter, EOF and IFS.

Synchronization and Re-synchronization

As there is no separate clock signal on the CAN bus, the node itself need to synchronize on the bus. For that reason, the underlying transmission format is NRZ-5 coding.
When the transmitting node sends CAN frame it consists the first bit of SOF (start of frame). All the receivers align themselves to this falling edge (recessive to dominant) after the period of bus idle. This mechanism is called hard synchronization.
After subsequent falling edges on the CAN frame are used to re-synchronize the nodes on bus and it is called soft synchronization. This resynchronization happens continuously at every falling edge (recessive to dominant transition) to ensure transmitting and receiving nodes stay in sync.

Additional functions

Some CAN protocol implementations offer optional functions that may or may not be a part of CAN specification. These include, for example, the single-shot transmission of data frames. This means that the automatic re-transmission in case of detected errors is disabled. This is useful for TTCAN add-ons and some tool applications.
Another option generally available is the bus-monitoring mode. The node can receive data and remote frames, but doesn’t acknowledge them and also doesn’t send error and overload flags. Nevertheless, these dominant bits are communicated internally in the CAN module.
In another optional restricted operation mode, the CAN module behaves equally, but it acknowledges received data and remote frames. The error counters are not incremented and decremented in this mode. If a node is the TTCAN time master, it must be able to transmit the time-reference message; other frames must not be transmitted.
For some applications, message time stamping is required. ISO 11898-1:2015 specifies that the optional time-stamp function features resolutions of 8-bit, 16-bit, or 32-bit. The time-base value is captured at the reference point of each data frame and it is readable after EOF (end-of-frame). Other (not standardized) optional functions include readable error counters, configurable warning limits, interrupt request generation, and arbitration lost capture.
If the CAN implementation allows changing the configuration of a node by software, the configuration data (e.g. bit-time configuration or operating mode) needs to be locked against changes while CAN communication is ongoing.

Armed with details of CAN communication, we will now attempt to understand general configuration of a CAN node for transmission and reception with examples from a real controller.

About Embien

Embien Technologies is a leading provider of product engineering services for the Automotive, Semi-conductor, Industrial, Consumer and Health Care segments. Working with OEMs in Industrial segments, we have developed numerous gateways, sensory modes on top of CAN network and protocols such as DeviceNet, CANOpen etc. Our Automotive experience enabled us develop Telematic units and In-vehicle Infotainment systems, Instrument clusters with CAN interfaces.

Geo positioning system or GPS has become more or less a norm for smart phones. Geo positioning system was first created for the navigation of defense vehicles in any part of world. But over the period of time, this system is being used in many other purposes outside defense and has proved itself to be a revolutionary technology in today’s world. Apart of the smartphone, most of the premium cars and commercial vehicle do have inbuilt GPS for fleet tracking, vehicle Telematics, and driver assistance.

Apart from such fleet navigation use cases, GPS are now being used for many applications such as locating nearby restaurants, hotels and gas stations and finds huge applications in tourism industry. Personal navigation devices also employ GPS technology.

Also most of the IoT/M2M applications use GPS modules. Some of them are as follows

  • Smart utility metering
  • Connected health and patient monitoring
  • Smart buildings
  • Security and video surveillance
  • Smart payment and PoS systems
  • Wearable devices etc

While the term GPS in general represents the technology, there are numerous systems being used to achieve this. In this blog, we will briefly describe about the various such Geo positioning systems and related concepts.

Geo Positioning System – Technology

Any geo positioning system uses about three to four satellites from more than a dozen of satellites orbiting in a group (satellite constellation) to provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning. These satellites transmit 1500 bits of data such as the satellite health, its position in space, propagation delay effects, constellation status, the time of information being sent, etc. This allows a small electronic receiver to determine its location in terms of latitude and longitude based on triangulation of the data obtained from at least three satellites. With four or more satellites, the receiver can also determine the 3D position, i.e. Latitude, longitude and altitude. In addition, a GPS receiver can provide information about the speed and direction.

Anyone with the GPS receiver can access the system. Since it is an open source and providing almost accurate 3D position, navigation and timing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, all over the world, it is used in numerous applications even in GIS data collection, mapping and surveying.

Geo Positioning System – Types

At present there are many options available for geo positioning system each of them owned and operated by countries such as US, Russia, European Union, China, etc. They are as follows

NAVSTART GPS – GPS, Global Positioning System is a one among the various satellite navigation system designed and operated by the U.S. Department of defense. Official name of GPS is Navigational Satellite Timing and Ranging Global Positioning System (NAVSTAR GPS).

GLONASS – Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System, GLONASS developed by Russian, is an alternative to GPS and is the second global navigational system in operation providing global coverage with comparable precision. A GLONASS satellite design has various upgraded versions and the latest is GLONASS-K2 which is expected to operate in early 2018.

Galelio – Galelio is created by European Union with the aim to provide an independent high precision positioning system for European nations.

BeiDou – BieDuo Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is a Chinese satellite navigation system consisting of two separate satellite constellations BeiDuo-1 and BeiDuo-2. BeiDuo-1 is decommissioned and BeiDuo-2 also known as COMPASS offering services to customers in the Asia-Pacific region with a partial constellation of 10 satellites in orbit.

IRNSS – Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System also known as NAVIC (Navigation with Indian Constellation) is a regional satellite navigation system covering the Indian region extending 1500Km. This constellation is already in orbit and expected to operate in early 2018.

Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS)

All the above systems are autonomous and governed by the respective countries. Other than autonomous systems, other regional augmented systems are available that run with the aid of other autonomous satellites. These augmentation systems will provide reference signals (Signal in Space- SIS) via satellites to the receivers including correction information with the objective of increasing the accuracy of the position. In addition to the accuracy they also help to maintain the reliability and availability of the navigation system. The whole system is known as SBAS (Satellite Based Augmentation System) and satellite providing the SIS signal are known as SBAS GEO satellites. Some of them are as follows,

GAGAN – GPS-Aided Geo Augmented Navigation – It is the implementation of SBAS by Indian government. It supports pilots to navigate in the Indian airspace by an accuracy of 3m.

QZSS Quasi Zenith Satellite System is a project governed by Japanese government and operated in order to receive the US operated GPS in the Asia-Oceania regions with Japan as a primary focus.

Other commonly available SBASs are WAAS (US), EGNOS (EU) and MSAS (Japan).

GNSS

The above mentioned satellite systems such as global, regional and augmented systems are integrated together to form Global Navigation Satellite System, GNSS. It is a standard term for satellite navigation systems providing autonomous geo spatial positioning with global coverage. It is a satellite system that is used to pinpoint the geographic location of a user’s receiver anywhere in the world. Three GNSS systems are currently in operation: the United States’ Global Positioning System (GPS), the Russian Federation’s Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and the Europe’s Galileo.

Most degrading factor of a receiver, i.e. Line of Sight degradation can be solved with the GNSS system due to its accessibility to multiple satellites and if one satellite system fails, GNSS receivers can pick up signals from other system.

Navigation messages

Any satellite in the constellation will transmit a detailed set of information such as each satellite position, network to receiver called the navigation messages. Following are available in the navigation message, 

  1. Date and time together with the satellite status and an indication of its health 
  1. Almanac data – Contains coarse orbit and status information of all the satellites in the constellation. It allows the GPS receiver to predict which satellites are overhead, shortening acquisition time. Almanac data can be received from any of the satellites. The receiver must have a continuous fix for approximately 15 minutes to receive a complete almanac data. Once downloaded it is stored in the non volatile memory.
  1. Ephemeris data – Contains precision correction to the almanac data necessary for the receiver to calculate the position of the satellite. It is continuously updated every 2 hours and so ephemeris data of a deactivated receiver will become stale after 3 to 6 hours.

Time-To-First-Fix (TTFF)

For a receiver to get a fix, it needs a valid almanac, initial location, time and ephemeris data. When a receiver is switched ON, it requires some time delay for the first fix. This delay depends on how long since the stored data’s being used. The time delay is commonly termed as Time To Fist Fix, TTFF and it is one of the main factor for receiver selection.

About Embien

Embien Technologies is a leading provider of embedded design services for the Automotive, Semi-conductor, Industrial, Consumer and Health Care segments. Embien has successfully designed and developed many products with GPS for various domains such as Wrist wearable based tracker device for healthcare, Vehicle Telematics device for automotive, Data acquisition/logger devices for industry etc.